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CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 6:00pm EST
many ways in the first beta of hippies that came to the city really have the drawbridge pulled up on them. many of the kids can get treatment with a drug problems and other medical problems. they were given the cold shoulder by the city officials, the cops harassed them. so that was only the beginning of what became the very first culture were anything great here in san francisco. america's first culture where was the civil work in the disco is of between these new forces, social forces that began sweeping the city in the 1960s and 1970s with gays. one step work really took hold, and became quite bloody. i written about the so-called san francisco values weren't born with flowers in their hair. they were born howling. the book i should say does have a happy ending because the city ultimately trying triads. it resolves these differences after very brutal times and with the help of then mayor who is not terribly beloved in the city at first couldn't win the office because she was a little straightlaced received cisco, diane find time. but she was the kind of calm in hand and stable pol
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 7:00pm EST
, contributing editor of "rolling stone magazine" returns to the city to present a history and profile the influx of artists, environmentalists, and city planners who are reimaging the urban landscion. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> i'm thrilled mark asked me to be a part of this. as they said, old friends from ann arbor where we went to college and editors at the college newspaper. i knew then that mark was from the area, like i am, but i didn't know of his intense interest in history and the stories here, and so that leads me to my first question which is what really led you to want to write this book? i remember you calling me when you were starting to work on it, and you said, i want to write a book about detroit. i thought, yeah, well, so does everybody; right? [laughter] this turned out to be a different book than others we red now. >> i sensed that a tiny bit when we got lunch. you were one the first people i talked to about it, and thank you, first of all, for doing this. i guess, i don't know, i've always been drawn to detroit as a topic, and, you know, i thought fo
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 11:00pm EST
really should read it. the city of this that i am on my shelf. this is truly the first hardcover book i ever bought. it's as much love as i can show anything. there is knowing in without dave barry. pat quinn of -- no one made fun of kraft earlier. with that said, without further ado. [applause] >> thank you so much. the onion would never write him back. folks cannot my name is will tracy. this is our new book. 183rd imperial addition. encyclopedia of all the world's knowledge, anything in the world that exists is in this book. anything that is not in the book does not come in fact, exist. so dave's new book is not in this book so it does not, in fact, exist. >> dave barry is not in the buck. dave barry is a figment of our collective imagination. we will come into existence of the power of the mind theater to read this book is, as i said, an encyclopedia. for those are not familiar with the most powerful organization in the world founded in 1756. oppression farmer heard traded sector hands for printing press and founded the mercantile line in named after the only three words of englis
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:00am EST
. the city had burned down 16 times by an arsonist. and i thought, who is this that? so basically i am a true crime writer. and then i found out one of these firemen, it was tom sawyer robinson, i think it is, that he had run with the very first volunteer fire department in california. back in new york where tom was a torch boy, he had been in competition with broderick. when he came west to make his fortune, he basically wanted to be a senator. tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw -- heavyweight champs, gunslingers, con men, absolutely amazing people. and we are very close to it. that tom sawyer actually met him in may of 19 -- 1863. mark twain like to talk to tom because tom knew great stories. all these little little bits and pieces and stories, that is how long it took, 15 years. can you imagine? i do love it. it is so fun. i guess i could read you some now if you would like. this may take a second. i have never read in public before. so i will start with a quote from tom sawyer. here it is. if you want to know how to i come to figure in his book, eat kn
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 5:00pm EST
in new jersey has a heart and spirit and sold it does much more for our city knowing about you and covenant house i felt very privileged to write the foreword because it would recognize the fact my dad would have been homeless himself. board to a single mother, very poor. and even more so. my dad was po. [laughter] he could not afford the other two letters. [laughter] but through his extraordinary love his family kept him on a trajectory forward. he was able to put first semester's tuition but it is a conspiracy of love makes me to i am today but it starts with the young people. what bothers me is he talks so dramatically in a negative fashion and we don't realize everyone end was of a child to prevent the challenges he faces as an adult. douglas said it is easier to raise strongmen. who i feel the urgency we do not prioritize our children as much as we should. >> you say the labor party is the forward. it is so from the heart and this week you are engaged in the snap challenge? >> i was up late with my girlfriend on twitter. [laughter] when will our mayor get a life? it was a sund
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:00am EST
an enjoyable experience, to read and encounter. >> for more information on this and other cities on the local content vehicles to work, go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> booktv is on facebook. like us to interact with booktv guests and viewers. watch videos and get up-to-date information on events. facebook.com/booktv. >> rachel cox, who was robbie cox? >> robbie cox is my deceased uncle who made the decision in june of 1941, six months before pearl harbor brought america into world war ii, he made the decision that he wanted to fight the war against fascism, and went to england and enlisted as an officer candidate with the british army. he took with him for friends, another man who was a student at harvard, and three other guys who who had recently graduated and were doing what they could to help the cause of freedom and liberty against the forces of nazi fascism speaks that he was studying at harvard at the time. what was he studying and what was his life projector at that point? >> well, he, like his four brothers had grown up in new jersey and vermont where his family had had pr
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 8:00pm EST
most populated city in syria, it is in northern syria. there is a local part of the city, the countryside as well. the countryside and the city make up the government -- [inaudible] of syria. all of the perl -- the 70% of the cities have been stripped away. the first enacted in the cities is i was hosted by veteran prerevolutionary [inaudible] , that is eerie and citizens going to get it to do what they can. the first thing we did it to her. most of the shops were closed down. to be honest with you, -- by the way, i am using aleppo is a case in point. to be honest, i thought that i would need -- [inaudible] we were very le we were very lesson and surprised. the operation we encountered was a lot more sophisticated than i thought. they held elections. the chairman was a highly educated person with a phd, doctor [inaudible name]. they also started the committee on the local administration and the committee on finance making sure that every penny is accounted for. we are working on a number of projects to stabilize the city and help our transition. >> can you say the two words ab
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 12:15am EST
machine is like and what and ipad is like. they are also building more cities than anybody else, going from 75 cities of 1 million people to two 20 cities of 1 million people to almost 20 cities of ten million people and in doing that they will be building our highways and power plants of tomorrow and the czech writer has a lot of power in what these look like so they will be dictating what those things look like as well and as they create vast reserves of wealth and giving it to people who need to borrow it europeans who need to borrow it gain influence that way and when they go to latin america where they are the number one trading partner investor in brazil or africa where they are number one investor they get a lot of influence that way. is not just economic growth but economic leverage and economic power. they are growing as a soft power leader in the world and that is something we need to watch carefully because their interests do not always a line which hours. >> host: next call from maurice in walton, ky. >> caller: hello. >> host: please go ahead. >> caller: i would like to as
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 10:00pm EST
differences. i am from kansas city which during my childhood was known in as the gateway to the west. he was from st. louis and the government builds the arch okhotsk and proclaimed themselves gateway to the west and we called them mound city. we think of st. louis as the exit to the east of. [laughter] there's similarities between t.s. eliot and me. we both use foreign languages in our poetry. he tends to use more sanskrit. actually don't know much of it. i was a kid who'd got dreamy during sanskrit class in kansas city, missouri. [laughter] to look out the window. i use some yiddish. [laughter] it is fair to say that t.s. eliot was not partial to yiddish. my shortest poem uses yiddish. it was called something like this societal political and philosophical implications of the o.j. simpson trial. the title does not count. the plan was o.j. or a vague [laughter] -o.j. oi vey and then -- we both use a little german when george w. bush appointed a retainer that rhymed roberto gonzales. we both cried about animals and he famously wrote a lot of things about cats. my daughter said once at
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:45pm EST
not happy with what he something like that that inner-city when you are living in a tent. there is something like 74,000 acres of land we are still going dealing with a very urgent and difficult situation in haiti. >> host: where did your book, "so spoke the earth" come from? >> guest: it came from women writers of haitian descent. it is the navigation of patients to tell their stories and these groups of women, the edited this anthology. it is "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know." different women talk about this. it is a trilingual anthology in english, french, and creole. it's generational. we talk about the people who were surviving it. we talk about their friends and neighbors. there is an opportunity for people who don't know much about haiti to get to know katie through a variety of women writers wasted. >> host: is creole very different from french? >> guest: creel -- creole is a language of its own. it came from the french, spanish, english, all of these people came to haiti. and so creole is a very beautiful language. it is oft
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 12:00pm EST
[applause] >> i am pleased to announce the city of albany have the honor of hosting the time warner cable c-span local content vehicle cities for. this program travels the country to capital cities, teaching the history of literary life of these communities. albany was chosen because we are a city of rich history and an interesting local literary community. .. >> find the best writers that we can and bring them to albany. it's like bringing the world to a particular place, and i don't think -- i can't think of any other organization, even some of the better known ones in major cities that that have such a rer flow of creative talent coming through and at no cost to the public. with our open door policy. so we bring the literary world to albany. so all these people whose names, faces and dates, events you see are people who have come from far and wide to read to the, to the general public here. and we've had somewhere, my most recent count now has gotten us up to at least 10 or maybe 11 nobel laureates across the years ranging from toni morrison who actually used to teach at albany t
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 7:45am EST
and the author of this book, his first book, "instant city: life and death in catchy." karachi." steve inskeep, what happened in karachi on december 20, 2000? >> i'll let you and thanks by the way for the invitation and what for you guys are doing. on december 20, 2009 there was a religious procession in the middle of this gigantic mega- city, one of the rapidly growing megacities in the world that was bomb. it's a tragic story but when you begin digging into the details of that single day, peeling back the layers, what i discovered was the star that to me a loom and it's the way the world is developing, the way the world is going. the way that different kinds of people are coming together in cities, sometimes quite violently, and thrashing out our future. this is an event i learned about that became this book. now, how many people were killed, who bombed to? >> about three dozen people. saying precisely who bombed who is challenging, but in the end it turned out to be am at least according to the authorities, a militant group which is why many militant groups that are little known in
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 1:25am EST
against requirements of many cities that any parade be permitted, and the salvation army made it a practice not to apply for permits, and to be arrested, often playing instruments into the way into the cell, and challenges laws as anti-religious, and they won and lost a lot of them. they destabilized the law of the states by challenging these restrictions, and they never really made it to the supreme court of the united states, though, because the states were still in power. >> host: professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme court? >> guest: cases from the federal territories had come in the 19th century via, especially utah, questions of polygamy, but from the states, the really major cases made it to the supreme court in the late 1930s and early 1940s, really, that new deal era, and they tended not so much to be the salvation army, but the johova witnesses that caused trouble. >> host: what was one of the cases, walk us through. >> guest: an interesting case called cantwell against connecticut involved a group of witnesses that had gone int
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 12:00am EST
that reputation anymore that we thought it had. >> for more information on this and other cities on the local content vehicles tour go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> now on booktv robert sullivan presents a history of the american revolution with a focus on the middle colony, new york, new jersey and portions of pennsylvania. it also recalls the importance of the region during the war and visit several sites to document their historical significance and view the landscape today. from washington's crossing of the delaware to the battle of her clan. it's about an hour, 15. [applause] >> the subtitle of this book is an old irishman not being funny, so it's a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known two geniuses in my life. one is dead and the other robert sullivan is alive although that robert sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, t
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 9:00am EST
producers traveled the area as we explore the livery seen in new york's capital city and surrounding towns. .. >> and programs with young writers and a summer institute that we in saratoga. >> my life in the last few years was, i suppose you'd call it adventurous. but this thing ruined everything. [laughter] >> we go far and wide, find the best writers that we can ask and bring them to albany. it's like bringing the world the a particular place. and i don't think -- i can't think of any other organization, even some of the better known ones in major cities that have such a regular flow of creative talent coming through and at no cost to the public. with our open door policy. we bring the literary world to albany. so all these people whose names, faces and dates, events you see are people who have come from far and wide to read to the general public here. and we've had somewhere, my most recent count now has gotten us up to at least 10 or probably 11 nobel laureates across the years ranging from toni morrison who actually used to teach at albany to most recently a south african writer
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:30pm EST
is the third key question as well which is christians, the christians and the city's of levittown build societies together? and the kurds and sinise? it will be at the question. this is the questions of how different sex and religious treatises relate to each other, one of the central questions of the 21st century. that is one of the reasons we need a really robust field of interfaith cooperation helping to make vague the bridge of cooperation rather than a barrier of division or bomb of destruction. how do we do this well. you can see this as a robust discourse within the field of education reform or poverty alleviation or in car rentals and bill read is not about doing it. it's about doing it well. part of what we have done is look through the social science research of the last ten years and religious diversity whether it is work by robert putnam at harvard or princeton or pew and galloped and brown and all the social science research and ask the question of effectiveness. what does this teach us? and what you come up with is a very simple model called the interfaith triangle.
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 10:00pm EST
plenty of guns there, and, well, in reality, you couldn't carry a gun around in a town like dodge city is a good example. there were laws against that. you had to depart with your arms. if you with a cowboy coming in from the plains, there was a place to store your pistol if you had one. >> host: that doesn't fit with the way people think about it. >> guest: no. this is, of course, in settlements, not in the wild prairie, but, you know, they were like towns everywhere today. you need a little law and order in town, and that's hard to keep up with everyone has a pistol. >> host: a shootout at okay corral. >> guest: it started because they had a firearm carried around town, and incidentally, the understanding of what gun rights were for start in the 19th century and particularly, in the south. in the early 19th century, there was a big problem with duals between gentlemen, obviously, the most famous is aaron burr and alexander hamilton, but dueling was popular, but frowned upon and could be prosecuted. burr had to move around to avoid being prosecuted. >> host: vice president burr actual
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 1:00pm EST
social impact, and we are an economic engine of innovation for our city, for our region, and for the country in the world. >> is this the original location, where we are? >> no. we are in university city in west philadelphia. pan originally started in what was then a very small downtown city of philadelphia, and been moved to west philadelphia and will we call university city which we have helped make into a very vibrant arts and culture and economic hub. >> and once again, here is the book. it is the spirit of compromise, governing demands it and campaigning undermines it. this is book tv on c-span2. >> every weekend book tv authors -- offers 48 hours of programming focused on nonfiction authors and books. watch it here on c-span2. >> on your screen is a photograph taken in 1942. buffalo, new york. university of pennsylvania professor, what are we looking at? >> via looking at a woman who committed suicide out of a hotel in buffalo during the year, and a photographer happen to be passing by and took the picture. the picture appeared in life at the time and one widely acclaimed a
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 6:30am EST
-term partnerships with cities, rural areas, underserved communities. really political offices. that was a huge cultural change that had not existed. notwithstanding the rhetoric and the noble sounding goals, this trillion dollar down payment on transforming housing finance by showing america new way home, the book that jim johnson wrote was really an effort to do a much more straightforward and monday and objective. stop any unwanted and unwelcome changes to charter eye-catching the regulator, congress, and give copious amounts of affordable housing that would've published a. it all worked until the charter was changed on june 30, 2008, a mere weeks before their collapse. the same time, step two, a national homeownership strategy which brought in the rest of the lenders, and it literally brought everybody in the whole mortgage finance field into the fold. and created a partnership to accomplish financing more affordable and flexible indoor to increase homeownership opportunity. what happened, and you have the charts, anyone into competition with fha, down payments with a. i would on
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 4:00pm EST
terrible urban plight of the american city by giving the banks to lend and that integrate them into the financial system. very small at the stage. the kennedy reinvestment act is fairly kosher and terms of the way in which it's making those loans. by the 1990's, there is an explosion of mortgage debt and to black communities, enormous pride that the world is trying to buy secondary mortgages. the treasury proudly says so. and then every shares turned to business. the congressional inquiry and the crisis shows that 10,000 people in florida who were selling mortgages and florida have the conviction. for thousands of those. now, there were cards in the wheel compared to the giant financial institutions or running them. but it was that integration into the financial system which is part of the question you asked about unions. but it is only unions. in a sense, you know, we need to understand a very volatile time. >> we might want to open up to the audience. >> hi. i am with the union. talk about a systematic change. that they do. [inaudible] how would that happen politically? they don't
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:45am EST
combined to mark martin vicksburg but it was clear that the city, the batteries could not be taken without support of army troops. and general halleck who was the army commander of the theater, i like to call him general can't be done, told farragut asked if he could spare some of his 100,000 troops to help a railroad junction, to capture vicksburg. and how it said can't be done. don't have enough troops. and the level of the river was dropping so much, the union naval forces and the army troops were there, only 3000, were all getting sick. so the union forces actually gave up the effort to capture vicksburg in the summer of 1862 because the navy would help them do. which came somewhat as a surprise to note in public because the flotilla at that time, the navy had been doing a lot of things all by itself without any army support. they've captured -- they captured of port royal bay in november 1861. all without any army support at all. but clearly that run of success was going to come to an end. the confederates have now figured out some ways to carry the war to the union forces its
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 9:00pm EST
in the town like dodge city is a good example. there were walls against that. if you are a cowboy that came in when you were supposed to go story or pistol if you had one. >> host: that doesn't fit with the way that most people think about it. >> guest: this is of course settlements out in the wild prairie, but they are like towns everywhere today. you need to call and order in the towns and it's hard to keep that up. >> host: even the shootout at the corral was a starting point. >> guest: clams and i think it was had been arrested or accused of violating below will ordinance and forbade carrying a local firearm. incidentally the understanding of what gun rights were for beginning to evolve in the 19th century, and in particular in the south in the early 19th century it was a big problem with duals the most famous one is aaron burr and hamilton, but this was fairly common but it was frowned upon and it can be prosecuted and he had to keep moving around to avoid being prosecuted, so but one of the names of people who insisted on the spot started to do in the 19th century is carried
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 6:00am EST
next congress and it is very important. let me say whether we abuilding high-speed rail, inner-city passenger rail, transit services, any kind of infrastructure highways you would not want to build the four lane highway where there are no passengers or vehicles with access that you would not want to build a city transit system where you don't have adequate capacity and passengers to use that facility, the same thing holds true anymore with passenger service. when i heard president obama and this administration, beginning to promote high speed rail, unfortunately most of the money, the $10 billion, does not go for high-speed rail. they chose instead to support almost 150 projects and that number is growing and a lot of that money has been left behind. in fact, most of the money that has been read dedicated to high speed rail has been sent back by states including my state, the state of florida, we had to switch a proposal for high-speed rail, the actual speed was 84 miles an hour. 84 miles for one hour transit the distance of the proposed link in central florida, that is not high spe
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2012 6:00am EST
the strongest proponents of high-speed rail, inner-city passenger service, commuter and mass transit in the congress and in the united states but what we want our projects that make sense for the taxpayers, what we want our projects that operate where we have the greatest need and the lowest subsidization by the federal government for those activities but today we will focus almost entirely on the northeast corridor where we started comment and let me make a few comments about that. first, i have to say that the history of amtrak, attempting to provide high-speed rail in the northeast corridor, has been sort of a horrible history and maybe i can highlight some of the problems we have had. i don't want to just focus on the problems we have had but you have to learn by your experience. first, the original intent to develop high-speed rail, we came up with the a solo project, we had regional service in the northeast corridor, in the area from washington d.c. to new york and boston. and let me say i think it is absolutely critical that we develop that corridor. not only the regional inte
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 7:00am EST
plymouth might become involved in the small cities super broadband initiative, and help us to rebalance our economy and attract private investment? >> i'm very happy to meet with him, and i know that he stands up for a stronger for plymouth ever plymouth economy. he rightly says that on the science budget we made a decision right back at the start of this government to freeze the science budget rather than cut it as so many of the budgets were. i'm sure that was the right answer. since then we've added money back into the science budget. on broadband i will look carefully at what he says about the city broadband. of course, i'm sure he will be glad to know the devil and somerset have been aggregated over 33 million to deliver superfast broadband and we're working very hard to make sure all those plans are on track to deliver the super part broadband is important for cities but also important for world areas as well. >> -- rural areas as well. >> the prime minister and members of this house will be -- [inaudible] the police have stated there's evidence of loyalist parliamentary involved in s
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 6:00pm EST
cities. he was absolutely filled with a sense of power, and he wanted to gain more. he convinced political leaders and other cities to follow suit. he soon sent harbor fronts up and down the coast a roaring riot and gained a national representation as a great revolutionary leader. merchants, meanwhile, stopped importing british goods. within months, british manufacturers and exporters absorbed huge financial losses. british trade fell by 50%. the british merchants, the british exporters demanded that parliament repeal the stamp tax in america to restore trade relations. in 1765, parliament did just that and turned sam adams and james ottis into heros in boston and elsewhere in america. just who were the heros? well, both were from wealthy families, and, like, many sons of wealthy new englanders, they were harvard graduates. we all make mistakes. [laughter] if they had gone to yale, they would have behaved themselves, gone out and gotten decent jobs. [laughter] adams was the son of boston's largest brewer. you still see the name, but the current sam adams beer has nothing to do wi
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 8:00pm EST
. [inaudible conversations] >> of doctrine and welcome to the city club of cleveland. thank you it shall come the president of city club is. i am delighted to introduce to you today, so when can president effective january 1, ceo of separate ink, and managed health care and insurance provider and administrators serving over 11 million customers in the united states. over the past four years and into the recent election, the issue of health care has been at the center of our nation's great policy debate and implications beyond the health care industry impacting our larger fiscal policy and important social concerns. we are fortunate to have a test today mr. broussard insights on the industry in developing policy. prior to joining humana 2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking fo
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 5:15pm EST
weight problem as much a but of them. all the welfare states focused on the inner-city and that is why the problem of poverty is so much worse in the inner-city betrays this is where of these government programs focused their attention. when people become dependent on the state, they become dependent and lose the ability to launch the surprises of enterprise. we are seeing that in europe today and we are increasingly seeing any night stays. i think this is a pivotal moment and i think the u.s. can return to his entrepreneurial inspiration. the mac so are you making a moral argument? detected at all tourism and capitalism in the birth rate, et cetera. >> i think ultimately, economics as a moral foundation. capitalism is not based on dodgy dog competition. they conduct experiments and expand
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:00pm EST
times square in new york city, classrooms around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also going to cover some things that were not going tessie in the upcoming in a garish in january because this time we don't have a change of power. we're not going to have the transition as we see some times. nevertheless, in the morning at inaugurations when a president does leave office, 1961, here is to
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 2:30pm EST
use in your view to live outside some of the major cities of the u.s.? >> it could be. i mean, obviously there are pros and cons. we miss living near new york city. obviously we had a severe crisis, which i hope we don't. i'm not sure that large population centers where somebody would want to be. obviously it would be unthinkable should happen. it's not why we moved, if there were a really bad attack of one type of another, we don't live in a concentrated area. there are advantages. >> we have been talking with thomas woods junior. the most recent book "rollback: repealing big government before the coming fiscal collapse." this is booktv on c-span2 on locations in las vegas. >>> booktv on facebook. like us to interact with booktv guests and viewers. watch viewers, get up-to-date information facebook.com/booktv. booktv sat down with philip auerswald to discuss his book "the coming prosperity: how entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy." he was in atense for the fall for the book festival held annually at the university. it's about a half an hour. >>> now joining us h
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 3:00pm EST
and transported on 25 railroad cars to the city of holyoke where he rebuilt. it is now a museum on the national register of historic places, and you can go and visit it and walk around it. this is an image of what was left of skinnerville after the disaster. and it's hard to imagine what it was like before. it was a thriving factory village filled with houses, trees, stone walls, farmland, and of course, skinner's silk mill. this right here is the foundation of what was, tsa all that was left of -- that's all that was left of the mill. and it extended far to the left of the familiar. this is skinner's house, you can see the front piazza has collapsed. this is an image that is the image on the cover of our book, my book, i should say. and there was no image, of course, of skinner's mill after the flood, because it was gone. so we had to choose one that represented the disaster. this is all that was left of a neighboring brass factory that was 600 feet long, or the length of almost two football fields. more devastation from the village of skinnerville. and here is a house that was li
CSPAN
Dec 14, 2012 7:00pm EST
of indianapolis into it now has become one of the most attract david livable cities in america. as mayor, dick lugar worked carefully with the indiana general assembly, then governor would come to extend the boundaries of the city and merge indianapolis and marion county to provide common essential service is more efficiently, a concept that called unit of. unit of wasn't without conversely because of dick lugar's vision, careful negotiations and decisive action, indianapolis became a model for other cities across the nation. when the law took effect in 1970 indianapolis population rose from 476,000 to 783,000. moving from the 26th largest city to one of the nation's dozen large cities literally overnight. why didn't the numerous positive changes in indianapolis over the past 40 years, i see the fulfillment of the vision of then mayor dick lugar. not the midwest has a way of producing bad and the amended decency. none of us fall in that category. sometimes that sense is questioned, but we do have individuals who have the ability to see to the heart of the matter and find a way to r
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2012 5:30am EST
really brings the city as a part of the throat and it really does give some relief is he telling you will see on the atlanta falcons, you see the skyline on the top of the city, that is really nice and atlanta falcons, speaking of the skyline, these guys right here, setting the stage in setting themselves up to a run at the big game towards the end of the season. >>guest: i have to make sure you see the back of this because this is the sure the experience, this is the warm cozy wrapped itself around at the first quarter of the first game and still be wrapped around it at the end of sunday night football. they're so soft, so incredibly comfortable and that is why so many people pick them up to give to their kids come grandkids, for bed so far, you cannot go wrong with this as a gift and if you do have people and of life you know who are fans the different teams come to take advantage of by more and save.it is one of the first items that we offer here, with football fan shop, this goes out each year in and each one is different and unique but what they all are and 60 x 80, machinehable
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 8:00pm EST
small size kindergartens and extended day groups at schools in every single region and the city of russia. we need to provide families with an opportunity to put their children in kindergartens without wasting -- [inaudible] we need another long-standing problem of russia to resolve and that is the housing issue. this is something that the federal government as well as the regional government should address. thanks to our housing agenda, we have managed to increase the housing credits, which grow at the pace of 20% a year. but we know that housing loans are something that many people with medium and high taxes use, not the rest. and we need to make loans available to broader sections of russian society including technical experts, the academics and so on. we need to make economy class housing available as well as renting opportunities for russia's population. several regions of russia which practice support for rental housing markets. i would like to emphasize in 2014 will fully meet our commitments on providing housing to military personnel. we also need to finish our programs in
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 11:00pm EST
. >> host: he starts at columbia. his first night in new york city -- where did he spend a? >> guest: is very dubious about this in my book, but he -- he couldn't get into his apartment. he couldn't get the key of the sublet of the front of his mother's. so he slept outside of his suitcase. he said he had called and came over there the next morning. >> host: genevieve makes the scene in new york city. who is that? >> guest: genevieve cook is an australian who's mother had a second marriage to a notable american, so the family kind of had american ties. she came to new york city and met barack obama after he graduated columbia. they had a lot in common from the moment they met. they both had indonesian connections. the father and mother had lived in indonesia. he was a diplomat. and so she had lived there. her family was in the upper crust. and so she and barry both have this connection -- the indonesian connections as well. [inaudible] a fabulous researcher at "the washington post" and gabriel banks. eventually i found her and i can tell all that story because not because of the book
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
know, it helps us identify someone who is about to set up a nuclear bomb in new york city or something like that. it is very compelling. well, the argument is that if you use racial determination for college admissions, it is likely that there will be somewhat more -- somewhat more of unrehearsed, interracial conversations are in especially among students. under the african-american kids and a latino kids who get these preferences -- they will say something to the white kids and asian kids that have overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is a argument that the university of texas is arguing. that is an exception of non-discrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? okay. i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 8:00pm EST
-- punishment on ocean city. that protected $2 billion worth of property because we spend public money to protect private property. that worked. but now we're in to the recovery phase and this, and the response was great. we had heroic people. we were hit by a hurricane, on the shore and coming up our bay all the way to the inner harbor of the port of baltimore and hit by the blizzard in the western part of our state, which is the appalachians. we needed the national guard to respond. we had state troopers and other emergency responders on snow mobiles going in to take care of the elderly and get them out to safety. we did all of that. so now here we are. and now i'm going to just quick word about the shore. you heard what they said. [inaudible] rich in tradition and pride. hard working in -- [inaudible] hit by diesel fuel hit by what they consider unfair government. cash poor, community spirit, my question, and unemployment rate in that area that is in among the highest in the state, think of boot more baltimore city, it's at 9%. 9% and in some communities. 30%. 62% of the children are o
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 5:00pm EST
missionary to france to buy the louisiana territory. he didn't he sent them to buy the city of new orleans from fraps. the louisiana territory as a whole was not mentioned by anyone in the united states as even a possibility. so they traveled across the atlantic and lands in france and starts traveling toward paris. and before he arrives in paris, the american ambassador who was already there robert living stone approached who is that poll yon's foreign minister and said how would you like to boy the interterritory of louisiana. it's not vising living stone said yes. let's do it. they negotiate and they arrive and they complete the negotiations. they are -- james monroe. who would become marylandson's secretary of state and would then become's madison's suck receiver as president. we have a bunch of people who would be president almost president, evaluated. mob row and living stone complete the negotiation. they are not difficult. the french want to sell. they bigger problems with the britain. >> host: they want the cash. in louisiana they decided is a write off. >> that poleon thinks the
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 8:15pm EST
new york city and in classrooms around the country in paris and iraq, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also going to cover some things that we are not going to see in the of coming inauguration in january because this time we don't have a change of power so we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes but nevertheless at inauguration when a president does leave office here is the white eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 12:00pm EST
particularly heated thing after the troops captured mexico city on september 14th 1847, and here's an image of scott entering mexico city. if you look at the lower left-hand corner, you concede someone picking a barack in preparing to throw at the american troops. this is an immense that expresses the extreme hostility of many people in mexico city to having their city occupied by american troops. initially americans are extremely enthusiastic about the fact that their army had conquered the capital of another country, but when mexicans still refuse to come to terms and in the peace treaty, what began was very bleak occupation that ended up being terrible for the army in terrible for the pro-war movement generally. winfield scott's troops were suggested to daily -- subjected to daily guerrilla warfare, and there was no end in sight because mexico refused to get up at the same time a lot of expansionists in the united states, once the united states captured mexico city argues that maybe the u.s. should annex all of mexico. if you already conquered the capitol city, one that take all, and it
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 6:45am EST
from china. the city was the wartime capital of china. that's for all the major players in the book stay, and so since my childhood, i was intrigued by a lot of things. the oss was the wartime intelligence office. the reason why i couldn't write a book like this was because a late 1980s, bill casey who was the president of ronald reagan's cia director, he was also a history buff, decided to want to open up all the oss operation files. no one in the world had done it. you open up your own intelligence days of the entire operation file. that's amazing. so now it's at the national archives in college park, maryland. it's a gigantic record file. it has about 8000 feet of files. so i delved into this and i found some of the fascinating stuff. so i decided to write the book, and the book was first published in 1997 on the 50th anniversary of the cia. so it sold relatively well, and then 9/11 happened, and interesting intelligence organization, but then people were overwhelmingly interested, here now, and more internal affairs stuff. so a few years later, this one, this topic became sort o
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:15pm EST
is a relatively new mall outside of the old city called the manila mall and i gather at one point you were trying to buy some cosmetics there in a shop and you couldn't get any attention because the jewish saleswoman and the arab customer were deeply engaged in a very long discussion. >> eyeshadow. whether it should be frosted or whether it should match the headscarf or not match the headscarf and seriously, i went from there to lunch and i thought i was meeting a jewish friend and we were going to sit at a table overlooking the city. an arab family came in ahead of us and next to us was an orthodox jewish family, sitting and we were trying to get a table, which we finally did that the entire app is fair is like nobody's paying attention. everybody is saying what they are everybody of course, secular jews don't stress noticeably different than anybody else. >> american tourists do. describe the american tourist. >> well, little fanny packs. most of them are over 60 and have backpacks and that is how they describe them. it's so mixed and nobody is paying any attention. it's laughable.
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 6:00pm EST
live in geographic proximity to one another, we also have city governments, state governments in the united states, we have a federal government in the united states and it's only natural that another layer of government that deals with issues of loss. but over the course of the next hundred years from the lives of our children and grandchildren, we will see progress with it. the big question is whether the balance between the power of those public entities and big private enterprises that are the size of most of the biggest countries in the world. it also remains unbalanced. right now, our future is being determined in financial markets that are regulated by anybody. where the risk of a blow is a risk to each of us and those factors have been very successful in shrugging off and keeping away kind of regulation that could mitigate that risk. and the point is we need to pay attention there and we need to balance their, particularly in the united states, we are seriously out of on june 25, 1875 general george armstrong kuster and his entire command were killed by sioux, cheyenne and ar
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30pm EST
, like the city of hamburg in what is now germany. out in the midwest, they were more closely connected to new orleans then to new england. their farm produce went right down mississippi and out to the world through new orleans. they would have been happy to break away from those strange prudish puritanical prigs in massachusetts. what about texas? texas has always wanted to be its own country and it still does. they weren't going to stay in the confederacy. what about california, which in those days before the transcontinental railroad created in 1862, before the railroad, california to the united states. people walking alongside, people sailing for weeks and months around the southern tip of south america. california was eager to go its own way. secession in other words was a tiger that might bite in any direction. andrew johnson of tennessee, great unionist southerner, put it this way. if there is one division of the state, will there not be more than one? wouldn't north america soon be just as fragmented and war prone as europe lacks 33 petty governments, a little aristocr
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 8:30am EST
city university of new york in the ph.d. program -- [applause] >> thank you. [laughter] as i tell my history students until they wallet to choke me, the -- they want to choke me, the past is a foreign country. we can visit there, try to learn the customs, translate the language, feel the air and the light, sniff the fragrances, recoil at the foul odors, but we are foreigners in a strange land. this is true as much of the recent past as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including large numbers of kennedys, i much prefer working from written documents to listening to people talk and trying to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them, what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always ea
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 2:00pm EST
exams they tried this in new york city, washington, d.c. and chicago. in dallas they tried offering second graders to dollars for each book they read it's a promising idea that people are not very happy about it but let's have a discussion here and begin by taking a survey of opinion to the if you were the superintendent of one of these school districts and you were approached with this proposal, how many things it is a good idea worth trying and how many of you would object in principle? let's see first how many of you would object? how many of you would not like this idea? quite a few. and how many think that it's worth trying? all right we have a pretty good division of opinion. let's begin by those that object. who was willing to explain to offer your reason why do you think this would be objectionable in principle? and who will start us off? yes, stand up and we will get you a microphone. >> go ahead. >> i would object because there is a basic value in learning and a basic excitement about learning new things if you start paying for that you remove that basic excitement because
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:30am EST
the new brazilian president rio de janeiro city she called the most spectacularly youthful city she had ever seen and where the parties at the palace were fabulous. she did find it required quite a different -- they were experiencing a 75-degree climate change when they went in one day. until i bet you're the nixon's set off on another world tour. explained in a letter to helene that this was a fast and full trip. in the course of one day we were in three countries, thailand, pakistan and turkey. although her husband met with government leaders she again had our own schedule of events. again she wrote, it was a busy and happy but in such a short time so much could be accomplished. november of 1958 the couple traveled to london, where pat out much of the british press with her netting wardrobe and unspoiled manner. the following year they went to the soviet union and poland. in moscow that confronted nikita khrushchev in a famous kitchen debate during which the two leaders argued communism and capitalism in an exhibition of americans who markets. pat once again had our own agenda of
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 3:00pm EST
fluke, the only western correspondent in tehran, and we were driving back and forth across the city looking for -- checking at all the hospitals to see which one had a parking lot full of mercedes in them indicating that khomeini was inside. and we came around the corner near one hospital and ran right up against a checkpoint, rooted checkpoint -- road checkpoint. and there comes this heavily-bearded, fierce-looking young man with a kalashnikov and comes to my side of the car, indicating i should roll the window down. he looked at me with those eyes and said what is the best university for electrical engineering in the united states? [laughter] it's a reminder that in our analytical work from which the public sometimes takes a sense of demonization about other cultures that young people everywhere want pretty much the same thing. there are, of course, fanatics, there are extremists, but we have lost touch with a great deal of some of the cultures that we find ourself os embattled with. in trying to -- however the iranian crisis turns out this winter, next spring, it's not as importa
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:30am EST
that turns out to be one of my big projects or something is just to look around at the city and look at the landscape. this is a boring work, but to look up where we are. and so to go back to the strategy of the land. >> and serious. the book is an absolute revelation. i thought i knew about the american revolution. to discover -- discover that the cockpit, it's the kind of -- i mean you don't mention it in the book. but now we know that? added that escaped us? did you start out knowing that new jersey to markets see the entire revolution. >> someone reminded me, we lived in oregon for a lot of the 90's to my family. before i went to oregon i used to go have lunch all the time. i remember this now. i was very happy after i wrote the book. a bunch of guys who work toward guides gave me free passes to the top of the empire. and that was great. we spent lunch attack. kind of obvious, but it's a great view. and so -- >> really? >> really. really great deal. i just remember, remember as a kid reading about lincoln and and saying, you know, this was where it all happened. i know, and he wa
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 11:00pm EST
members of the southwest and others show that this has blighted development in our towns and cities. the proposal for my colleagues, that we create a long grace. for newly completed buildings, it is a sensible one. and we will introduce it next october. the previous government also plans to increase the small companies tax rates 22%, and we have cut it to 20%. unlike the small and medium-size firms, i want to thank my honorable friend for their help in this area. starting on the first of january and for the next two years. i am therefore going to increase by 10 fold in the annual investment allowance in machinery. instead of 25,000 pounds worth of investment being eligible for 100% relief, 250,000 pounds are not qualified. [cheers] this capital loans will cover cover the total investment undertaken by 99% of all of the business in britain. it is a huge thing to all those who run the business to aspire to grow and expand and create jobs. mr. speaker, i also want britain to have the most competitive tax regime of any major economy in the world. i have already cut the main rates from 2
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